Wednesday, July 24, 2013

WNUF


15 comments:

Jay's Shadow said...

Ha! I love it. "That's far out!"

The 1980's were great.

EmphaticReprieve said...

Have I been waiting for this my whole life?

Sara said...

They were so, soooo great.

Adam said...

Holy crap! Amazing! Will be buying my VHS copy for sure!

Goneferal inidaho said...

Wow, was that a real thing? I lived in the east of the Mississippi W world growing up. I now live int he "west" where all our stations start with a K.

Goneferal inidaho said...

Just to be a complete nerd- from wiki:
K and W[edit]
New broadcasting stations are assigned call signs beginning with K if they are west of the Mississippi River, and beginning with W if they are east of the river. No broadcast stations are assigned call signs beginning with N or AA–AL. Again, some early stations have been grandfathered, so there are four broadcasters with a K prefix east of the Mississippi, and a few dozen with a W on the west side. (There are more grandfathered W stations because the dividing line used to be two states farther west.) Some examples of stations with a now-unusual first letter are KDKA in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, KYW in Philadelphia, WBAP in Fort Worth, Texas, and WACO-FM in Waco, Texas, which also has the distinction of being one of only three radio stations whose call sign is the same as its community of license.[9] Stations located near the Mississippi River, as well as some northern Minnesota and southern Louisiana, may have either letter, depending on the precise location of their community of license and on historical contingencies. Metro areas that straddle different states on both sides of the river, such as St. Louis, Memphis, and Quad Cities area of Iowa/Illinois, have stations with both call letter prefixes, because of the stations' communities of license being placed on either side of the river.[10]
The FCC allows derived call signs in the same market as a commonly owned AM or FM without respect of the boundary, so stations may establish common branding across bands and services. One famous example was the case of the former KWK in St. Louis, which after several petitions was permitted to change the call sign of its sister FM station in Granite City, Illinois, then WWWK (FM), to KWK-FM. Later, the AM would change its call sign and the FM became KWK (FM), thereby becoming an exemplar of both categories of grandfathered stations.
The assignment of K and W prefixes applies only to stations in the broadcast radio and television services; it does not apply to weather radio, highway advisory radio, or time signal stations, even though these are all broadcasts in the usual sense of the word, nor does it apply to auxiliary licenses held by broadcast stations, such as studio-transmitter links and inter-city relay stations.
For example, the time signal stations WWV and WWVH are located in Colorado and Hawaii, respectively. (WWV originally began in Maryland and was later moved west. However, even ignoring that fact, U.S. government-owned stations are overseen by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) and not the FCC, and are thus not subject to the FCC's rules on call signs; most do not have call signs at all.)
NOAA Weather Radio stations clustered between 162.4 and 162.55 MHz have call signs consisting of a K or W followed by letters, and two digits. The K and W prefixes are both used interchangeably on both sides of the Mississippi River (e.g., KHB36 in Washington, D.C. and WXK25 in El Paso, Texas).
Highway advisory radio stations scattered throughout the AM band use call signs consisting of K and W followed by two or three letters and three digits. As with weather radio, K and W calls are both used on both sides of the Mississippi River.
Call signs in the western United States are often confused with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) airport codes because both make use of four-character codes that begin with the letter K. Examples include KSFO (which simultaneously refers to San Francisco International Airport and radio station KSFO (AM)), KLAX (which simultaneously refers to Los Angeles International Airport and KLAX-FM), and KDFW (which simultaneously refers to Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport and KDFW-TV).

Rot said...

ha..that's interesting data : )

And i do believe this is a new found-footage type film..made to look old.

Had me fooled at first.

love the feel of this.

Rot said...

http://www.roguecinema.com/article3712.html

Adam said...

Slightly disappointed this wasn't actually a real 80's Special that got dug up. Looks authentic as hell though

NoahFentz said...

That was cool...

girl6 said...

AHHHHHHHH!!!...NO Wayyyy...

slooooooooooooooooowwwwww

Rot said...

I thought for sure that it was "real" in the sense that some old broadcast from the 80s tried to fake a haunting for fun at the end of their news hour...

This is really cool. They totally captured the feel of those glorious old days

girl6 said...

Oh..Hey, & if you ever wanna see something very-Very similar to this..Except it's REAL & Current..just check out
the LaSalle tv station..OMG!!!!!!

Especially, the Halloween themed Episodes..aaaaaahahahaaaahhhhhh!!!
Priceless.. : D

i was Seriously addicted!

K.O. said...

That's genius! Even though it's a re-creation, they really captured the feel of the 80s Halloween Special. Ah, memories!!!

EmphaticReprieve said...

This will be available on VHS only, starting in August...

I love it already.

Time to find a VCR.